Fotografi, Fotografi de natură/landscape, Fotografi străini
Scrie un comentariu

Hans Strand: „To organise the chaos inside the four corners of the frame is what my photography is about.”

Iceland 2013_0711

* The Romanian version is available at the end of the English interview version.* Varianta în limba română este disponibilă la finalul interviului în limba engleză.

„The balance is what makes a photograph great. It is all about geometry inside a given surface. When the geometry is in balance, the image will also better communicate its content to the viewer.”

Portrait Hans Strand

Hans Strand is one of the most known European landscape photographers, being at the same time the representation of ideal in terms of photography for many photographers, beginners and experienced, as well. Complex but intimate, too, his photography shows us an another world of photography, that in which the creativity and the personal interpretation of nature’s style create the whole and the beauty.

1. You are one of the most well-known European landscape photographers and you represent an ideal to follow by many Romanian photographers. Before we start our way through your photographic activity, please introduce yourself to our audience and tell us a little bit about your passion for photography and how it became a lifestyle and also a professional occupation?

H: I started with photography pretty late in my life. I never had any plans of becoming a photographer when I was young. I educated myself to become an engineer. At the same time I graduated from university of technology in Stockholm in 1981, I bought my first camera, this at the age of 25. Almost at once, when looking through the viewfinder, I found a connection with the landscape in front of me. This connection is still there after 36 years. It took me 9 years of passionate hobby photography before I took the decisive step to become a full time professional landscape photographer in 1990. Since then I have travelled all over the globe looking for interesting landscapes. Iceland has become a special place for me. I have returned to the island 27 times and every time I discover new things. In 2014 I published a book on Iceland, ” Iceland Above and Below”.

White Water, Abisko River, Sweden, September 2016

White Water, Abisko River, Sweden, September 2016

2. Your websites’ baseline “Nature is always true and never trivial” is a personal philosophic thought about nature. Tell us about your relationship with nature and how its understanding contributes to the evolution of a photographer.

H: The wild natural landscape is a result of million years of evolution and therefore genuine and true. It is amazing what mother nature has created by herself. Sometimes far more complicated formations than man has ever accomplished. This is specially obvious when looking at our earth from above. Since my first flight over Iceland in 2000 I have flown something like 125 hours in Cessnas and helicopters making aerial photographs. From this elevated view it is also very obvious that man is the greatest changer of the natural landscapes. A few weeks ago I was flying over Spain and there 99% of the country is undulated by man. Almost every single tree is planted and every square meter is used for farming. For me, living in Sweden where we still have quite a lot of natural landscapes, this was quite a shocking experience. Still very interesting and I must admit that I my photography might have taken on a new course after this trip. To photograph the tracks and signs man has left behind might become my next project.

Tide coming in Snaefellsnes, Iceland, October 2016

Tide coming in Snaefellsnes, Iceland, October 2016

3. Some of your photos are describing very well the abstract in nature photography and in the same time its complexity. Is it hard to find a balance in this apparent chaos created by nature? And what does it take to reach this balance?

H: I am glad you mention the word ”complexity”. For me this is a very important ingredient in my work. The order from chaos is one of my dearest subjects. To organise the chaos inside the four corners of the frame is what my photography is about and the corners are very important. The balance is what makes a photograph great. It is all about geometry inside a given surface. When the geometry is in balance, the image will also better communicate its content to the viewer.

River Flow, Iceland, July 2009

River Flow, Iceland, July 2009

4. You said that „photography is not about capturing what you see, but to interpret what you feel.” What kind of feelings do you experience when you’re on the field with your camera, surrounded by nature?

H: A photographer’s task is not just to document what he or she observes. Great photography is about observing, digesting and making an interpretation. A great photograph is always a result of a personal interpretation. First an intelligent positioning and then a smart composition. That said I also think that photography is still a documentary art form. Which to me is equal to natural expressions of what the human eye is seeing in terms of color, contrast, movement etc. I dislike ”photo effects” made by filters. I think this is just a way of hiding a mediocre content.

CubismoWall, Iceland, June 2015

CubismoWall, Iceland, June 2015

5. How would you describe the term “intimacy” when it comes to landscape photography?

H: Intimacy is when you feel an almost religious presence in an image. This as a result of everything describes earlier. Often it is also about finding the right distance to the object. The viewer should feel that he or she is there at the scene when the photograph was made.

Misty Chaos, Hägersten,Sweden, November 2009

Misty Chaos, Hägersten,Sweden, November 2009

6. Aerial photography gives a new perspective on landscapes. Comparing it with the time when you are in the middle of it, how did this aerial vision change the way you see the beauty of nature?

H: The shooting from the air is very intense. It is like standing at the end of a conveyor belt and a stream of new landscapes are continuously coming towards you. It is not much time to reflect over what you have in your frame. It is more about making fast decisions how to analyse the enormous amount of signals that is entering your brain. The deeper reflections comes afterwards when looking at the results on the computer screen. 

River Dance, Iceland, March 2016

River Dance, Iceland, March 2016

7. The planning of a photo tour is far from being an easy task, and so is the moment when after finally being there, you are forced to say “ok, it’s enough for now”. How do you plan your photo tours and once there, on location how do you know when it’s time to stop?

I plan all my trips carefully. I try to figure out which kind of conditions I want for the images to come out as good as possible. Often it does not work the way I planned, this because of reasons I did not foresee. Still planning is very important. By planning you have a better chance to make a smart interpretation rather than just a documentation. I stop shooting when I run out of ideas.

Breaking Wave, Snaefellsnes, Iceland, June 2015

Breaking Wave, Snaefellsnes, Iceland, June 2015

8. In your photo book “Iceland Above and Below” you wrote that you first visited Iceland in 1995 and since then, over the years, you kept returning there more than 20 times. What does Iceland mean to you and how does it “speak” to you photography-wise?

H: I started to go to Iceland because it looked interesting and nobody seemed to be going there. This was in 1995. Now it is over crowded with photographers. Still there are tons of new spots to discover. Just stay away from the tourist vistas and you will be alone. I am personally very fascinated by the open landscapes. Where ever you are you can see for almost 50km in any direction. I also like the moody weather which gives the landscape a very special and serious character. Iceland works best in overcast conditions. Sunshine does not work in this landscape.

Meltwater Gully, Iceland, June 2013

Meltwater Gully, Iceland, June 2013

9. You became a professional photographer in the ’90’s, but since then, especially after 2010, the photography field has been faced and is continuing to face a boom of photographers, some of them really having a say in this field. How do you foresee the future of landscape photography? Is it on the right track?

H: I can see popular trends and the majority of photographers doing exactly doing the same thing. The same locations and the same shooting strategies. One is using dense neutral density filters and shooting everything with long exposures. It is like a believe that if you change the result to something you did not see with your eyes it is considered creative. I think creativity is not about putting filters in front of your camera or blurring an image. Creativity is something much deeper than an effect. I also think that in general there is an urge of showing nature more colourful and dramatic than it actually is. This as a result of too much saturation and overdone post-processing.

I prefer more poetic and quiet images free from sensation.

Cascades, Iceland, July 2013

Cascades, Iceland, July 2013

10. You have a lot of experience in the field, what advice would you give to someone who aspires at becoming a nature photographer, or even to someone who is already there and wants to continue growing?

H: Keep on doing your own thing. Don´t follow the trends. Only dead fish float downstream.

Clearing Mountains, Chamonix, France, November 2013

Clearing Mountains, Chamonix, France, November 2013

11. If you were to pick a single most definitive quality or skill that lead you to become who you are now, what would that be?

H: I have an ability to change my shooting strategies in one second and do something completely different from what I planned. This to adapt to the current conditions.

Fallen Beech, Söderåsen N.P. Sweden, October 2011

12. A message for our “Drumeți si drumeții” readers.

H: See question nr. 10.


For a spectacle of nature and lanscape photography, visit Hans Strand’s website and pay attention to each photo from there, cause it’s an open book from where you can learn about how beauty our nature is and how complex.

Text: Andreea Popescu, Hans Strand

Photos: Hans Strand


Portrait Hans StrandHans Strand este unul dintre cei mai cunoscuți fotografi de peisaj de la nivel european, fiind, tototată și reperul în materie de fotografie a multor fotografi aflați la început de drum, dar și a celor experimentați. Complexă, dar și intimă, fotografia sa ne prezintă un altfel de lume a fotografiei, cea în care creativitatea și stilul personal de interpretare a naturii creează întregul și frumosul.

1. Ești unul dintre cei mai cunosctuți fotograi de peisaj din Europa și, totodată, reprezinți un reper în ceea ce înseamnă fotografia, pentru mulți fotografi români. Înainte de a ne croi drumul prin activitatea ta fotografică, te rugăm să te prezinți cititorilor noștri și să ne spui puțin despre pasiunea ta pentru fotografie și cum a ajuns un stil de viață și, totodată, o ocupație profesională?

H: Fotografia a venit destul de târziu în viața mea. Atunci când eram mic nu am avut niciodată în plan să devin fotograf. Chiar am urmat studii să devin un inginer. Aveam 25 de ani, când, în același timp cu absolvirea Universitatății de Tehnologie din Stockholm, în 1981, mi-am cumpărat și primul aparat de fotografiat. De cum am privit prin viewfinder, am simțit o conexiune cu peisajul din fața mea. Acea conexiune este încă acolo chiar și după 36 de ani. Mi-a luat 9 ani de fotografie făcută ca un hobby, până când am făcut pasul decisiv de a deveni un fotograf de natură full-time, asta fiind în anul 1990. De atunci, am călătorit peste tot în lume căutând peisaje interesante, iar dintre toate, Islanda a devenit un loc special pentru mine. M-am întors pe insulă de 27 de ori până acum, iar de fiecare dată descopăr noi lucruri. În 2014, am publicat și o carte despre acest loc, ”Iceland Above and Below” (trd. Islanda de sus și de jos).

White Water, Abisko River, Sweden, September 2016

White Water, Abisko River, Sweden, September 2016

2. Sloganul site-ul tău: Natura este întotdeauna adevărată și niciodată trivială este un gând filosofic și personal despre natură. Povestește-ne despre relația ta cu natura și cum înțelegerea ei contribuie la evoluția unui fotograf.

H: Peisajul natural sălbatic este rezultatul a milione de ani de evoluție și, prin urmare, este autentic și adevărat. Este minunat cum Mama Natură a creat totul de una singură. Uneori, cu mult mai complicate formațiuni decât ceea ce a creat omul vreodată. Acest lucru este mult mai evident atunci când privești Pământul de sus. De la primul meu zbor deasupra Islandei în 2000 am zburat 125 de ore în Cessnas și elicopere pentru a face fotografii aeriene. Din acel punct înalt, se poate vedea foarte bine cum omul a produs cele mai mari schimbări peisajului natural. Acum câteva săptămâni am zburat peste Spania, acolo 99% din țară fiind conturată de către om. Aproape fiecare copac este plantat și fiecare metru pătrat este folosit pentru agricultură. Pentru mine, trăitul în Suedia unde încă avem o mulțime de peisaje naturale, a fost o experiență destul de șocantă. Totuși, trebuie să recunosc, că fotografia mea a luat un alt curs, după această călătorie. Așadar, pentru următorul meu proiect cred că voi fotografia semnele și urmele pe care le-a lăsat omul în natură.

Tide coming in Snaefellsnes, Iceland, October 2016

Tide coming in Snaefellsnes, Iceland, October 2016

3. Unele fotografii ale tale descriu foarte bine ceea ce înseamnă abstractul în natură și, în același timp, complexitatea sa. Este greu să găsești un echilibru în acest haos aparent creat de natură? Și, de ce anume este nevoie pentru a atinge acest echilibru?

H: Mă bucur că ai menționat cuvântul complexitate. Pentru mine acesta este un ingredient foarte important în munca mea, iar ordinea din haos este unul dintre cele mai dragi subiecte pe care le abordez. Fotografia mea este despre organizarea haosului în interiorul celor patru colțuri ale cadrului, iar colțurile sunt foarte importante. Echilibrul este ceea ce face o fotografie, să fie grozavă. Totul este despre geometria din interiorul unei suprafețe date. Când geometria se află în echilibru, imaginea va comunica mai bine conținutul său către privitor.

River Flow, Iceland, July 2009

River Flow, Iceland, July 2009

4. Ai spus că fotografia nu este despre a surprinde ceea ce vezi, ci pentru a interpreta ceea ce simți. Ce fel de sentimente experimentezi când ești pe teren cu aparatul de fotografiat, înconjurat de natură?

H: Misiunea fotografului nu este doar o documentare a ceea ce, el sau ea, observă. Fotografia extraordinară este despre observare, digerare și a face o interpretare. O fotografie extraordinară este întotdeauna rezultatul a interpretării personale. Mai întâi o poziționare inteligentă, iar mai apoi o compoziție inteligentă. Spun asta și cred totodată, că fotografia este totuși o formă de artă documentară, lucru care pentru mine, este egal cu expresia naturală pe care ochiul uman o vede în termeni de culori, contrast, mișcare etc. Îmi displac “efectele fotografice” realizate cu ajutorul filtrelor. Mă gândesc că acesta nu este decât un mod de ascundere a unui conținut mediocru.

CubismoWall, Iceland, June 2015

CubismoWall, Iceland, June 2015

5. Cum ai descrie termenul de “intimitate” când vine vorba de fotografie de peisaj?

H: Intimitatea e atunci când simți o prezentă aproape spirituală într-o imagine. Aceasta este un rezultat a tot ceea ce am descris mai sus. Adesea, este și despre a găsi distanța potrivită față de un obiect. Privitorul trebuie să se simtă ca și cum ea sau el a fost acolo acolo atunci când fotografia a fost făcută.

Fallen Beech, Söderåsen N.P. Sweden, October 2011

Fallen Beech, Söderåsen N.P. Sweden, October 2011

6. Fotografia aeriană dă peisajelor o nouă perspectivă. În comparație cu momentele în care ești în mijlocul naturii, cum se schimbă modul în care vezi frumusețea naturii, atunci când o priviești de sus?

H: Fotografiatul din aer este foarte intens. Este ca și cum stai la sfârșitul unei benzi transportatoare și un flux nou de peisaje vine încontinuu spre tine. Nu ai prea mult timp pentru a reflecta asupra a ceea ce ai surprins într-un cadru. Este mai mult despre luarea de decizii rapide cu privire la cum să analizezi cantitatea enormă de semnale care intră în creier. Reflexiile mai profunde asupra rezultatelor vin mai târziu, atunci când le privești pe ecranul computerului.

River Dance, Iceland, March 2016

River Dance, Iceland, March 2016

7. Planificarea unei ture foto este de departe a fi o sarcină ușoară, la fel este și monentul când în sfârșit ești colo și trebuie să spui “ok, este destul de data aceasta”. Cum îți planifici turele foto și, odată ajuns în locație, cum știi când este timpul că trebuie să te oprești?

H: Îmi planific toate călătoriile cu atenție. Încerc să îmi dau seama ce fel de condiții îmi doresc pentru ca fotografiile să iasă cât mai bine cu putință. Uneori nu iese după cum am planificat, din motive neprevăzute. Totuși, planificarea este foarte importantă. Planificând ai o șansa mult mai mare să faci o interpretare inteligentă, decât o pură documentație. Mă opresc din fotografiat, atunci când rămân fără idei.

Breaking Wave, Snaefellsnes, Iceland, June 2015

Breaking Wave, Snaefellsnes, Iceland, June 2015

8. În cartea ta ”Iceland Above and Below” ai scris că ai vizitat pentru prima dată Islanda în anul 1995, iar de atunci, peste ani, te-ai întors de mai bine de 20 de ori acolo. Ce înseamnă Islanda pentru tine și cum te inspiră din punct de vedere fotografic?

H: Am început să merg în Islanda pentru că arăta interesantă și nimeni nu părea să meargă pe acolo. Asta era în 1995. Acum este arhiplină de fotografi. Cu toate acestea, există încă o mulțime de locuri de descoperit, doar să stai cât mai departe de locurile turistice și vei fi singur. Personal sunt foarte fascinat de peisajele deschise. Poziția din care poți vedea aproape 50 km în orice direcție. De asemenea îmi place, vremea capricioasă, care conferă peisajului un caracter serios, dar și foarte special în același timp. Islanda e atrăgătoare când în condiții închise, când cerul e acoperit. În acest peisaj, soarele nu arată bine.

Meltwater Gully, Iceland, June 2013

Meltwater Gully, Iceland, June 2013

9. Ai devenit un fotograf profesionist în anii ’90, dar de atunci, în special dupa 2010, domeniul fototografiei se confruntă și va continua să se confrunte cu un boom al fotografilor, unii dintre aceștia având, totuși, ceva de spus. Cum vezi viitorul fotografiei de peisaj? Este oare ea pe drumul cel bun?

H: Pot vedea trendurile populare din fotografie și majoritatea fotografilor facând exact același lucru. Aceleași locații și aceleași strategii de fotografiere. Unul dintre acestea, este folosirea de filtre de densitate, iar altul fotografierea cu expuneri lungi. Este ca și cum ai crede că dacă vei schimba rezultatul cu ceva ce nu ai văzut cu ochii tăi, ar fi ceva creativ. Eu sunt de părerea că creativitatea nu este despre a pune filtre în fața camerei sau de a blura o imagine. Creativitatea este ceva mult mai profund decât un efect. De asemenea, cred că, în general, există un îndemn de a arăta natura mai colorată și mai dramatică decât este ea de fapt. Acesta este un rezultat al prea multei saturări, precum și a unei post-procesări chinuite.

Prefer imaginile poetice și tăcute, fără senzație.

Cascades, Iceland, July 2013

Cascades, Iceland, July 2013

10. Ai acumulat o mulțime de experiență în domeniu, ce sfat ai da celor care aspiră la fotografia de natură sau celor care deja fac asta, dar doresc să evolueze?

H: Continuă să faci lucrurile în stil propriu. Nu urmări trendurile. Doar peștele mort poate pluti în aval.

Clearing Mountains, Chamonix, France, November 2013

Clearing Mountains, Chamonix, France, November 2013

11. Dacă ar fi să alegi o singură calitate sau abilitate care te-a ajutat să ajungi cine ești, care anume ar fi aceea?

H: Am abiliatea să-mi schimb strategiile de fotografiere într-o secundă și să fac ceva complet diferit față de ceea ce mi-am planificat. Asta pentru a mă adapta la condițiile actuale.

Fallen Beech, Söderåsen N.P. Sweden, October 2011

Fallen Beech, Söderåsen N.P. Sweden, October 2011

12. Un mesaj pentru cititorii „Drumeți și drumeții”.

H: Vezi întrebarea nr. 10.


Text: Andreea Popescu, Hans Strand

Foto: Hans Strand

 

Lasă un răspuns

Completează mai jos detaliile tale sau dă clic pe un icon pentru a te autentifica:

Logo WordPress.com

Comentezi folosind contul tău WordPress.com. Dezautentificare /  Schimbă )

Fotografie Google+

Comentezi folosind contul tău Google+. Dezautentificare /  Schimbă )

Poză Twitter

Comentezi folosind contul tău Twitter. Dezautentificare /  Schimbă )

Fotografie Facebook

Comentezi folosind contul tău Facebook. Dezautentificare /  Schimbă )

w

Conectare la %s